Category Archives: Care of elderly

Social care postcode gap widens for older people

Older people in England’s most deprived areas are twice as likely to lack the help they need for basic acts, like using the toilet or taking medicine, compared with those in the richest neighbourhoods, according to figures that expose gross inequalities in access to social care.

The official analysis is another sign that years of cuts have damaged the ability of councils in poor areas to meet the growing demand for care, potentially putting significant pressure on the NHS. It comes on the back of the crisis over social care that is still unresolved. There have been a series of warnings about a multibillion-pound funding black hole and increasingly severe consequences for the health service.

A third of men aged 65 and over in the most deprived areas (33%) have an unmet need for at least one so-called “activity of daily living”, such as washing their face and hands or getting out of bed. In the least deprived areas the figure falls to 15%. Meanwhile, 42% of women over 65 in the most deprived areas have an unmet need for at least one such activity, compared with 22% of their counterparts in the richest areas.

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Elderly patients afraid to complain in ‘care’ homes

Hundreds of thousands of elderly people are “suffering in silence” because they are too afraid to complain about their treatment in care homes and hospitals, a government watchdog says.
According to a report published today, a third of over 65s who experienced below standard care did not speak up because they were concerned their future treatment would be compromised.
The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman said it had received far fewer complaints than it would expect from older people, given their frequent use of the NHS and social care services.
“Older people are some of the most frequent and vulnerable users of health and social care services but are the silent majority when it comes to complaining.”
Julie Mellor
Of the ten million people aged over 65 in Britain, the watchdog found 76 per cent used the NHS this year.
But of the 14 per cent who were unhappy with their care, only half of that number complained.

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Trending Mad Friday Tim Peake Syria bombing ISIS Terrorism Technology Money Travel Fashion Mums Home News UK News Hospitals Pensioners to be charged £26 ‘falling fee’ to be helped back to their feet by local council

A district council said it would introduce the fee on top of the existing cost of a subscription to its service for elderly people who require home care.

Pensioners who need help being helped back to their feet after a fall at home will be charged £26 by their local council.

Tendring District Council said it would introduce the fee as part of its Careline service for elderly people who require home care.

An elderly rights campaign group has described the charge as “shocking” and equivalent to a ‘falling fine’.

The £25.92 annual charge means a carer will come to pick an elderly resident up after a fall.

Our comment: This sounds crazy, older people will be scared to pull the chord when in need.


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Families shun care homes to look after elderly themselves

Overall number in care has gone up by just 1,000 in decade despite pensioner numbers rising by a million

Proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions more working families would lack time to look after relatives
Better health and increased life expectancy likely influenced shift
But high costs and concerns over quality of care in low-paid industry beset by scandals may also be factors, say Office for National Statistics

Tens of thousands of families are shunning care homes to look after elderly relatives themselves instead.

Official figures show that while pensioner numbers have risen by almost a million in a decade, the number in care rose by just 1,000.

This means the proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions that more working families would lack the time to look after parents and grandparents.

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Families shun care homes to look after elderly themselves

Overall number in care has gone up by just 1,000 in decade despite pensioner numbers rising by a million

Proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions more working families would lack time to look after relatives
Better health and increased life expectancy likely influenced shift
But high costs and concerns over quality of care in low-paid industry beset by scandals may also be factors, say Office for National Statistics

Tens of thousands of families are shunning care homes to look after elderly relatives themselves instead.

Official figures show that while pensioner numbers have risen by almost a million in a decade, the number in care rose by just 1,000.

This means the proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions that more working families would lack the time to look after parents and grandparents.

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Pensioners ‘could be forced out of their homes’ due to emergency cord price hikes

Frail pensioners are facing massive hikes to the cost of lifesaving emergency pull cords – which could force them out of their homes.

The weekly cost of the service, which alerts wardens, will rocket from £3.70 to £9.53 by 2017.

Pensioners who do not receive benefits may have to fork out up to £53 a month.

Tory-run East Devon council claimed funding cuts meant “it is only right” the cost should be passed on to sheltered housing tenants.

But disabled Cathy Moyle, 72, said she was being forced “to choose between life and death”.

Cathy, of East Budleigh, gets a pension of just £230 a week with husband Gerald, 85. She said: “Some of my friends are suicidal at the rises.”

The gran of seven claimed residents even feared eviction. She added: “I’m terrified. There’s no option to opt out so it means we have to pay up or leave. They say if we don’t need the cords we don’t need sheltered accommodation.”

The Sunday Mirror previously revealed how the service was being axed in West Midlands because of cuts. Officials said the scheme, which costs just £1.08 a week per ­person, was too expensive.


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