Category Archives: Care of elderly

Elderly patients afraid to complain in ‘care’ homes

Hundreds of thousands of elderly people are “suffering in silence” because they are too afraid to complain about their treatment in care homes and hospitals, a government watchdog says.
According to a report published today, a third of over 65s who experienced below standard care did not speak up because they were concerned their future treatment would be compromised.
The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman said it had received far fewer complaints than it would expect from older people, given their frequent use of the NHS and social care services.
“Older people are some of the most frequent and vulnerable users of health and social care services but are the silent majority when it comes to complaining.”
Julie Mellor
Of the ten million people aged over 65 in Britain, the watchdog found 76 per cent used the NHS this year.
But of the 14 per cent who were unhappy with their care, only half of that number complained.

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Trending Mad Friday Tim Peake Syria bombing ISIS Terrorism Technology Money Travel Fashion Mums Home News UK News Hospitals Pensioners to be charged £26 ‘falling fee’ to be helped back to their feet by local council

A district council said it would introduce the fee on top of the existing cost of a subscription to its service for elderly people who require home care.

Pensioners who need help being helped back to their feet after a fall at home will be charged £26 by their local council.

Tendring District Council said it would introduce the fee as part of its Careline service for elderly people who require home care.

An elderly rights campaign group has described the charge as “shocking” and equivalent to a ‘falling fine’.

The £25.92 annual charge means a carer will come to pick an elderly resident up after a fall.

Our comment: This sounds crazy, older people will be scared to pull the chord when in need.


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Families shun care homes to look after elderly themselves

Overall number in care has gone up by just 1,000 in decade despite pensioner numbers rising by a million

Proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions more working families would lack time to look after relatives
Better health and increased life expectancy likely influenced shift
But high costs and concerns over quality of care in low-paid industry beset by scandals may also be factors, say Office for National Statistics

Tens of thousands of families are shunning care homes to look after elderly relatives themselves instead.

Official figures show that while pensioner numbers have risen by almost a million in a decade, the number in care rose by just 1,000.

This means the proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions that more working families would lack the time to look after parents and grandparents.

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Families shun care homes to look after elderly themselves

Overall number in care has gone up by just 1,000 in decade despite pensioner numbers rising by a million

Proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions more working families would lack time to look after relatives
Better health and increased life expectancy likely influenced shift
But high costs and concerns over quality of care in low-paid industry beset by scandals may also be factors, say Office for National Statistics

Tens of thousands of families are shunning care homes to look after elderly relatives themselves instead.

Official figures show that while pensioner numbers have risen by almost a million in a decade, the number in care rose by just 1,000.

This means the proportion of older people in residential homes has fallen – despite predictions that more working families would lack the time to look after parents and grandparents.

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Pensioners ‘could be forced out of their homes’ due to emergency cord price hikes

Frail pensioners are facing massive hikes to the cost of lifesaving emergency pull cords – which could force them out of their homes.

The weekly cost of the service, which alerts wardens, will rocket from £3.70 to £9.53 by 2017.

Pensioners who do not receive benefits may have to fork out up to £53 a month.

Tory-run East Devon council claimed funding cuts meant “it is only right” the cost should be passed on to sheltered housing tenants.

But disabled Cathy Moyle, 72, said she was being forced “to choose between life and death”.

Cathy, of East Budleigh, gets a pension of just £230 a week with husband Gerald, 85. She said: “Some of my friends are suicidal at the rises.”

The gran of seven claimed residents even feared eviction. She added: “I’m terrified. There’s no option to opt out so it means we have to pay up or leave. They say if we don’t need the cords we don’t need sheltered accommodation.”

The Sunday Mirror previously revealed how the service was being axed in West Midlands because of cuts. Officials said the scheme, which costs just £1.08 a week per ­person, was too expensive.


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Some in northern counties envy the Scottish benefits – but would they last?

Men from the Ministry/Scots Referendum
As we near the fateful day, it perhaps isn’t surprising that there are people south of the border who are envious of the benefits which people in Scotland enjoy free:

  • Prescription charges
  • Elderly Care
  • University Tuition Fees
  • Bus Passes from age 60
  • Bedroom Tax
  • Hospital parking charges
  • Bridge Toll Fees

Listening to some of the televised debates one could take an implication that an independent Scotland would be able to make more things free. In reality we think it might be wise to keep hold of this list, and see how many remain after a few years of independence, and the facing of reality alone. I’d put a better chance on them remaining if Scotland decides to remain part of the Union.

Numbers of elderly needing care will soon outstrip relatives able to help

IPPR thinktank estimates 2 million aged over 65 in UK will lack informal care from adult offspring by 2030

Within four years 800,000 people in the UK may need care, and 20,000 will have no family to help, says the IPPR. Photograph: David Sillitoe for the Guardian

The scale of the gathering social care crisis has been underlined by new figures showing the number of older people is expected to outstrip the number of family members able to provide informal care for them for the first time in 2017.

Within four years, it is predicted, 800,000 people may be in need of care, including 20,000 with no family to care for them, according to a report by the centre-left thinktank the IPPR.

By 2030 there will be 2 million people aged over 65 without adult children to look after them, up from 1.2 million in 2012, and about 230,000 of them will be in need of more than 20 hours’ care a week and will have no informal support.

The average annual cost for an older person who pays for 10 hours of home care and receives five meals on wheels a week has increased to £7,900 a year – up almost £740 since 2009-10 – and nursing homes now cost an average of £36,000.

The report will accelerate private discussions under way in the Labour party about how it can integrate social care and health services, and whether this will require any kind of earmarked extra spending.
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Cameron: Pensioners who splurge pots will fund own long-term care (from where exactly ?)

Retirees who withdraw their pension pots in one lump sum could end up paying for their own long-term care, Prime Minister David Cameron has suggested.

During a speech in Brighton earlier this week, Cameron eased concerns that retirees would spend all their savings under looser drawdown rules announced in the Budget (PP Online, 19 March) and still fall back on the state for long-term care costs.

He said: “It’s deeply condescending to say to people who’ve worked hard, who’ve saved all their lives, who’ve been thinking about the future, ‘you can’t trust them to spend their own money because they’re irresponsible people’.

“They’re not irresponsible people; they’re responsible people. That’s why they saved in the first place.”

The Prime Minister went on to explain that the single tier pension of £140 per week will end means testing, and that the government cap individuals’ long-term care costs at £75,000 (PP Online, 4 July 2011).

He added: “It is lifting people out of the means test, so even if they do go and spend lots of money on certain things, they’re not going to be reliant on a means-tested system.
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Our comment: a distorted logic here I think, if some people do blow their pension pot (and the experience in Australia suggests that some will, and which seems almost inevitable to us) what will they then pay for their long term care with ?

Energy company SSE’s profits surge by nearly 40% weeks after 9% rise in bills

SSE, the energy company behind Southern Electric, Swalec and Scottish Hydro, has revealed a leap in profits of almost 40%, just a month after announcing a 9% increase in bills.

The UK’s second-largest generator of electricity said its £398m half-year profit was necessary to “make investments that keep the lights on”. However, consumer groups, and even rival energy providers, questioned the scale of the increase.

Richard Lloyd, executive director of Which? consumer magazine, said it bolstered the case for an independent review of gas and electricity charges.

“Without greater scrutiny of energy prices, consumers simply will not believe that they’re getting a good deal,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Co-op’s fledgling energy business warned that the SSE results would further alienate customers. “Announcements of huge profit increases for shareholders do nothing to help the tarnished image of UK energy industry or get to grips with consumer concerns,” said Nigel Mason, of Co-operative Energy. “This profit announcement off the back off a 9% bill increase will be a bitter pill for SSE customers to swallow.”

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If you develop cancer, the NHS will pay for your care says Clegg

If you develop cancer, the NHS will pay for your care, no matter who you are and what your income.

If you develop dementia, and the care you need isn’t radiotherapy or expensive drugs but help with washing, dressing, and going to the bathroom, you could find yourself confronted with bills of more than £100,000. In fact, one in 10 older people ends up paying more than £100,000 for care.

Every year between 30,000 and 40,000 people sell their home to pay the bills: between 80 and 110 people every single day. That simply isn’t fair, and the Government confirms plans to change the system.

We will make sure no-one is forced to sell their home to pay for care in their lifetime, and no-one sees their life savings disappear just because they developed the wrong kind of illness.

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Our comment: The devil is in the detail.

Pensioners will still have to sell their houses for

Elderly Care
Elderly care cap: ‘Pensioners will still have to sell their houses’
New measures to limit the cost of social care to £75,000 do not deal with the reality of the care crisis, according to Dot Gibson, General Secretary of the National Pensioners Convention.

Ms Gibson was speaking shortly before Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, announced that from 2017, anyone with assets, including their home, worth more than £123,000 will have to pay for the first £75,000 of their care costs. They will also pay “bed and board” of up to £12,000 annually when in a nursing home.

The proposed cap on social care marks an improvement on the current system, which requires anyone with assets of more than £23,000 to pay the full cost.

However, an independent commission, led by the economist Andrew Dilnot and set up by the Coalition, recommended a £35,000 cap on care bills and a £10,000 annual limit on “bed and board” costs. It said state help should be available for those with less than £100,000 and that the system should be introduced now.

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