Category Archives: health

apply National Insurance Contributions to pensioners’ earnings, think tank reports

A new generational contract is needed to tackle the big challenges Britain faces for young and old, covering a better funded NHS and care system, a radically reformed housing market, and a new citizen’s inheritance to boost the prospects of younger generations. This is according to the final report of the Intergenerational Commission published today (Tuesday).

Over the last two years and via 22 reports, the Intergenerational Commission – chaired by Lord Willetts and including TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady and CBI Director-General Carolyn Fairbairn – has investigated the stresses and strains on Britain’s contract between generations, and what can be done to renew it.

The generational contract reflects the fact that we judge the success of a society by how it treats its old, and believe strongly that each generation should have a better life than the one before.

However, the Commission warns that the public are increasingly questioning whether Britain is offering young people the prospects previous generations have enjoyed. This is not just confined to younger generations either, with healthcare now the most pressing area of worry for British adults.

The Commission finds that much of this pessimism is borne out by the evidence it has uncovered:

Income and wealth progress for young adults has stalled

New analysis shows that the disposable incomes of millennials at age 30 are no higher than the generation before them (generation X) at that age – despite the economy growing by 14 per cent over the last 15 years. In contrast, the incomes of baby boomers at age 30 were more than one third higher than the generation before them.
Millennials are half as likely as the baby boomers were to own their own home by 30, and are four times as likely to rent in the private sector.
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Our comment: That ‘Millenials’ are less well off than previous generations is understood, and the need for appropriate levels of funding for the NHS, though we believe that the cost should be shared by all. Older people have already lost the Age Related Tax Allowance.

NHS hospitals in England made £174m from car park charges in 2016/17, and NIL in Scotland or Wales

Car Parking Charges

NHS hospitals made a record £174m from charging patients, visitors and staff to park in 2016/17, up 6% on the previous year.

Data from 111 hospital trusts across England shows that as many as two-thirds are making more than £1m a year. More than half of trusts now charge disabled people to park.

Some trusts defended the charges, saying they were essential to pay for patient care. But opposition parties and patient support groups were critical, with one group saying they were “cynical” but blaming the state of NHS finances rather than the trusts themselves.

The Liberal Democrats condemned the charges as a “tax on sickness” while Labour said it was committed to ending them.

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The government condemned “complex and unfair” parking charges and called for reform, but a Department of Health spokesman said they were a matter for local NHS organisations rather than central regulation.

Our comment: A founding principal of the foundation of the NHS was created out of the ideal that good healthcare should be available to all, regardless of wealth. We regard the way hospitals are charging for hospital parking is incompatible with that principal.

Parking remains largely free at hospitals in Scotland and Wales.

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Cruel scammers are preying on elderly victims through computers and smart phones

Cruel scammers are preying on elderly victims through computers and smart phones, MPs were warned.

Web fraudsters are forcing older people offline for good after preying on elderly victims through computers and smart phones, MPs were warned.

OAPs’ confidence in digital technology is so shaken by internet crime they decide they no longer want to be online, the Public Accounts Committee was told.

Victims are even going into care homes after being targeted, experts revealed.

Age UK policy chief Jane Vass said there was “huge scope to do much, much more” to tackle web tricksters.

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A pensioner is calling for a change in the rules after a friend, who suffers from dementia, was refused a bus ride for losing her pass.

David Hall and pal Margaret were hoping to catch the Fastrack B bus to Dartford town centre on August 4, when they were told the 80-year-old was not allowed on.

The grandmother-of-six had lost her bus pass, which entitles her to free travel, earlier in the week and had visited Dartford Library to buy a new one

She was told the new pass would not arrive for two to three weeks so kept hold of her receipt and had been using it as proof of payment to travel on other buses.

Mr Hall, 75, said: “The bus driver said she wasn’t insured to be on the bus.

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Some constructive alternatives for funding care of the elderly

There are a lot of comfortably off pensioners. And lots of poor ones. And there are a lot better ways of finding money for elderly care than Theresa May’s manifesto commitment to whipping the houses off people who need care at home.

Under the Conservative’s plan, people needing either domiciliary (aka at-home) or residential care will have to pay for everything until the value of their assets, including their home, is down to £100,000. The Tories promise that no one will be forced to sell their home in their lifetime to pay for care, with the cost instead deferred and taken from their estate after death.
Care of the Elderly Costs
The plan is superficially seductive. The older generation have benefitted from spectacular – and largely unearned – increases in the value of their property. Why should younger working people, through income tax, pay for the galloping costs of elderly care when they can’t even dream of affording to buy a home themselves? Doesn’t it make more sense to instead take the money out of the congealed wealth sitting in property? And, indeed, there can be no justification for the state protecting the inheritances of the well off by taxing hard-pressed working people.

But there are two major drawbacks. Firstly, there is the risk that the elderly will delay seeking support at home because they won’t want to enter into a domiciliary care plan involving a charge on their property. They won’t get early treatment and will fall on the NHS.

The second drawback is more serious. No one chooses Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s – they choose you. Health inevitably deteriorates in old age, but the conditions that will result in intensive care costs, whether domiciliary or residential, are largely random. A quarter of the over-85s are likely to develop dementia and a third will need constant care. But that leaves large numbers not in need of intensive care. Indeed, only one in eight over-85s are in care homes.

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We don’t for a moment think that someone in their 50s with breast cancer should have a lien put upon their home to pay for their care. We share the risk by paying through our taxes for the NHS and community care services. Why, then, should we think that a random third of the over-85s should have charges added to their homes but the other two-thirds not?

But that doesn’t take away from the fact that the increasing cost of care for the elderly needs to be found somewhere, and it would be unfair for the young to shoulder all the burden.

One of the oddities of the tax system is that we stop paying 12% national insurance on our earnings once we reach state pension age. The idea is that NI is basically a savings system that pays for our pensions, so once we’re in receipt of a pension we stop paying in. But NI, when first set up, was a system of insurance against illness and unemployment. If NI is supposed to help fund the NHS and care services, there is no reason why pensioners – the better off at least – shouldn’t be paying it, albeit at a reduced rate.
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overfull A&E departments in NHS Hospitals

HospitalA&EOverflow2
Nurses at NHS hospitals are treating patients in corridors because of severe overcrowding in A&E departments.

Footage taken by the BBC shows patients waiting more than four hours to be seen at Royal Blackburn Hospital, where at one point last week 33 beds were available for 95 seriously ill people.

Nurse Danielle Turner told the broadcaster: “We actually have corridor nurses now as well, which shows times are very desperate”.

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