Category Archives: pensioners

Threats to pensioners from increased taxation

Numerous birds are coming home to roost from George Osborne’s cuts of a few years ago. e.g

  • Spending on the military now considered too low
  • Funding for the NHS not sufficient to meet the needs of an increase in the numbers of elderly people, and advances in technology.
  • Local government bodies getting into difficulty

(on the last item I note from our local borough council rates leaflet that goverment grants to the council have declined steadily from £130 millions in 2013/14 to approx £20 millions in the current financial year, and will reach zero by 2020/21, whilst demands for social care change in the opposite direction.)

No wonder bus routes are being cut to a stage where older or disabled people need to look to other forms of transport, and is likely to cause increased numbers of cars on the road.

Proposals to hit the elderly include a proposal that pensioners should continue to pay national insurance into old age:

The tax that pensioners should pay to fund care

Protest rally plan over free bus passes as state pension age changes

A campaign group made up of women adversely affected by changes in the state pension age is set to hold a protest rally this month.

Members of The Women Against State Pension Inequality (WASPI) group will have to wait several years for their pension following the Government’s decision to raise their retirement age to 66 by 2020.

The previous age had been 60, meaning as many as 220,000 women from across the West Midlands have been forced to change their retirement plans as a result of the decision.

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Tens of thousands of pensioners face cuts to income after huge HMRC trawl identifies decades of errors

A huge trawl of records comparing HMRC’s official files with those held by pension schemes has identified errors dating back as long as 40 years ago.

Retired workers with both public and private sector pensions face reductions to their future pension payments, which in some cases will see their retirement income halve.

In some cases pensioners have been paid too little and will receive back payments in addition to future increases. However they will not receive any interest on the payments or compensation.

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Our comment: Is this intended to make pensioners panic that some minor omission might crop up ?

apply National Insurance Contributions to pensioners’ earnings, think tank reports

A new generational contract is needed to tackle the big challenges Britain faces for young and old, covering a better funded NHS and care system, a radically reformed housing market, and a new citizen’s inheritance to boost the prospects of younger generations. This is according to the final report of the Intergenerational Commission published today (Tuesday).

Over the last two years and via 22 reports, the Intergenerational Commission – chaired by Lord Willetts and including TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady and CBI Director-General Carolyn Fairbairn – has investigated the stresses and strains on Britain’s contract between generations, and what can be done to renew it.

The generational contract reflects the fact that we judge the success of a society by how it treats its old, and believe strongly that each generation should have a better life than the one before.

However, the Commission warns that the public are increasingly questioning whether Britain is offering young people the prospects previous generations have enjoyed. This is not just confined to younger generations either, with healthcare now the most pressing area of worry for British adults.

The Commission finds that much of this pessimism is borne out by the evidence it has uncovered:

Income and wealth progress for young adults has stalled

New analysis shows that the disposable incomes of millennials at age 30 are no higher than the generation before them (generation X) at that age – despite the economy growing by 14 per cent over the last 15 years. In contrast, the incomes of baby boomers at age 30 were more than one third higher than the generation before them.
Millennials are half as likely as the baby boomers were to own their own home by 30, and are four times as likely to rent in the private sector.
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Our comment: That ‘Millenials’ are less well off than previous generations is understood, and the need for appropriate levels of funding for the NHS, though we believe that the cost should be shared by all. Older people have already lost the Age Related Tax Allowance.

Pensioners given ‘ASBO’ for putting plants outside their flat

Two pensioners were slapped with an “ASBO” for putting plants and a welcome mat outside their home of 35 years.

John Whelan, 70, and his wife Alicia, 67, were recently handed an “ASBO” for trying to brighten up the communal areas of Sefton Park tower block in breach of fire regulations.

Former project manager Mr Whelan said the corridor has been left looking like a ‘prison’ since residents of York House on Croxteth Drive were ordered to remove any decorations.

An injunction, which has been seen by the ECHO, was issued to Mr and Mrs Whelan in January, forbidding the couple from ‘placing any items in the communal areas’.

Mr Whelan claims the “ASBO”, which lasts for the lifetime of the couple’s tenancy, could result in the couple being evicted – if they were to break the conditions of the order.

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Our comment: is this really what ASBOs were intended for ?

Social care postcode gap widens for older people

Older people in England’s most deprived areas are twice as likely to lack the help they need for basic acts, like using the toilet or taking medicine, compared with those in the richest neighbourhoods, according to figures that expose gross inequalities in access to social care.

The official analysis is another sign that years of cuts have damaged the ability of councils in poor areas to meet the growing demand for care, potentially putting significant pressure on the NHS. It comes on the back of the crisis over social care that is still unresolved. There have been a series of warnings about a multibillion-pound funding black hole and increasingly severe consequences for the health service.

A third of men aged 65 and over in the most deprived areas (33%) have an unmet need for at least one so-called “activity of daily living”, such as washing their face and hands or getting out of bed. In the least deprived areas the figure falls to 15%. Meanwhile, 42% of women over 65 in the most deprived areas have an unmet need for at least one such activity, compared with 22% of their counterparts in the richest areas.

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